F.A.Q.

Q

How should cheeses be stored?

A

Once opened, they would ideally be stored in their original packaging or in cling film. That way they keep their flavour and it limits bacterial contamination. Once each cheese is individually wrapped, you can store them together in a plastic container, and they will keep even better.
All cheeses must be stored in the refrigerator in an area where the temperature is between 4°C and 6°C.

Q

Can you eat cheese while on a diet?

A

Absolutely! In order to lose weight, it is recommended that you watch your fat intake, but you can’t cut out fat altogether. On the other hand, you have to make sure that you maintain your vitamin and mineral intake.
Cheese is an excellent choice to get your recommended amount of calcium. The cheese should be chosen particularly for its high amounts of calcium, limited to a certain portion per day, and supplemented by two lean dairy products to allow you to get the calcium you need without excess fat.

Q

Can you eat the rind of Camembert and Brie?

A

The soft, white rind of Camembert and Brie can be eaten with no problems at all. The white mould that covers the rind is produced by Penicillium candidum or by different varieties of it.

Q

At what age can babies start eating cheese?

A

Starting at 8 months, your little one can start tasting cheese in the form of a pinch of grated cheese added to his/her mash or soup, or even one or two slices of soft cheese without the rind.

Q

Which cheeses have the highest amounts of calcium?

A

Those that are made with the most milk, which are harder and more compact. Pressed cheeses are thus the ones with the highest calcium content. A 30g piece of Emmental may include one third of an adult’s daily reference intake of calcium.

Next are the blue-mould cheeses (blue cheese, Roquefort) and soft cheeses (Camembert). It is important to vary the cheeses that you eat in order to take advantage of their different nutritional qualities and their diverse flavours.

Q

What is pasteurisation?

A

Pasteurisation is a heat treatment whose goal is to kill a portion of unwanted micro-organisms contained in a food that could develop while the food is being stored.
Food products like milk are heated to a minimum of 72°C for 16 seconds. Pasteurised foods should be stored in the refrigerator and eaten quickly.

Q

What is traceability?

A

Between the cow that provides the milk and the dairy products that you eat, there are many different steps: collection, processing, transport, storing, etc. Traceability means being able to piece together the history of these products and what they are made of.